Chaperones

9 March 2015

Length: 3:39

The do's and don'ts of using chaperones during intimate examinations. Presented by Dr Ellie Mein.

This page was correct at publication on 09/03/2015. Any guidance is intended as general guidance for members only. If you are a member and need specific advice relating to your own circumstances, please contact one of our advisers.

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DR Rustin

Excellent, clear and concise.
Well done!
What happens if the chaperone also is a translator? Presumably the translator stays throughout or perhaps it is inadvisable to have the translator as a chaperone because of patient confidentiality/embarrassment?

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The MDU

Thank you, and that's a good question. You would need to bear in mind the GMC guidance 'Intimate examinations and chaperones: Guidance' (2013), paragraph 9c of which states that 'a chaperone should usually be a health professional and you must be satisfied that the chaperone will be familiar with the procedures involved in a routine intimate examination.' As such, it seems unlikely that the majority of translators would meet these two criteria.

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DR Rustin

Excellent, clear and concise.
Well done!
What happens if the chaperone also is a translator? Presumably the translator stays throughout or perhaps it is inadvisable to have the translator as a chaperone because of patient confidentiality/embarrassment?

Report comment